Dominated by an eight foot wide two- sided fireplace, the sixteen foot tall slope ceiling in the living room and dining room experiments with a string of turquoise glass block portals ringing the rooms just below the ceiling line.

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Photo Living Room Canada Residence
 

Canada Project

Lakeway, Texas - 2,800 Square Feet

 

THE PROGRAM

Designed for the architect's parents on a wooded, sloping lot sandwiched between two fairways and a golf course lake, this residence draws it's stylistic roots from the Texas Hill Country's Spanish Mission influences. The client's program requirements were simple and direct:

  • Take advantage of the west facing views to the fairway and lake
  • Utilize passive solar energy design techniques
  • The house should set sensitively on the severely sloping terrain
  • Develop a style reminiscent of a Southwest Spanish mission
  • Reincarnate as building materials the oak and cedar trees cut down on the building site
  • Eliminate all steps on the entry level and auto court. The main level is to be self sufficient, another level being separate for guests


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THE SOLUTION

In part, due to the severity of the slope and drainage issues, we arrived at a solution for a two-story design with entry at the upper level. The lower level is tucked up under the upper level on the rear-right hand side where the slope is most severe.

To eliminate the pouring of high slab foundations, 12" split face concrete masonry units on concrete grade beams were selected as a foundation system. The main portion of the house is a "bridge" design spanning over interesting rock ledge shelves. This feature also allows site drainage to flow uninterrupted underneath the house. A seventeen-foot long bridge spans over a ravine to connect the auto court to the front entry. A courtyard wall provides privacy for the pool and outdoor shower.

The 12" concrete masonry unit foundation wall transitions to a 4" veneer wainscot with a tile coping. The cmu block has been finished with a "smear" mortar joint to disguise the block and imitate an ancient Spanish masonry technique. Conventional stucco, in a traditional mission peach color, is the building skin between the masonry and the roof overhang.

A traditional terra-cotta clay tile roof is used throughout except for the covered verandas where a screw down enameled metal roof is utilized. The extensive covered verandas wrapping around the exterior provide sheltered outdoor rooms and passive solar shading devices. Their framework displays exposed structural cedar beams, columns reclaimed from the site, corbels and rafters.

Two large diameter live oak trees needed to be cut down to build this house and were resurrected in the form of milled fireplace mantles and custom furniture.

Dominated by an eight foot wide two- sided fireplace, the sixteen foot tall slope ceiling in the living room and dining room experiments with a string of turquoise glass block portals ringing the rooms just below the ceiling line. They disperse moving turquoise solar rays around the rooms in the early morning and late afternoon.

This residence was honored and recognized by the American Institute of Architects and selected for the local chapter AIA Homes Tour in 1994.

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San Antonio Missions

The San Antonio Missions, like a time capsule, preserve the Spanish Southwest as it was during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

The still standing Missions are: San Jose y Miguel de Aguayo, San Juan, Espada, and Concepcion.

Photo Mission San Jose
Mission San José

Mission San Jose

Mission San Jose was founded in 1720. It is named honoring Saint Joseph and the Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo, governor of the Province of Coahuila and Texas at the time.

The Mission's founder was Father Antonio Margil de Jesús, a Franciscan missionary in early Texas.