Transparency evolved into a reoccurring theme upon which we could rely to celebrate the dynamic and ever changing views of the lake and cliffs

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Photo Wirth Residence Nightime
 

Wirth Residence

Lake Austin, Texas - 4,400 Square Feet


Project Description

Situated on a flat 1 acre lot on the shore of Lake Austin, the retired client couple requested that our studio design a residence that would instill an impression of both contemporary and timeless space to both live, display art and work at home.

Transparency evolved into a reoccurring theme upon which we could rely to celebrate the dynamic and ever changing views of the lake and cliffs beyond throughout seasonal changes. Natural daylighting and its reflections become theater to observe while living in this space. Passive solar energy design concepts were utilized to benefit from the warming rays in the colder months and to protect itself from the harsh sun in the warmer months. Natural ventilation is encouraged and used as an alternative in the moderate months. A jewel at night when lit from within and seen from the water, by virtue of it's transparency, this "machine for living" takes on many different personalities and moods. It is truly a 4 dimensional space that takes the dimension of time in order to experience and understand the structure.This project was recognized by the American Institute of Architects with a Citation of Honor in it's 1989 Design Awards Program.

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Art in Austin

The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin, is committed to being a center of excellence. Its permanent collection is composed of over 17,000 works of art from Europe, the United States, and Latin America. The museum also features a dynamic changing exhibition schedule that allows visitors to experience a broad range of artistic expression and history.

The Blanton Museum of Art


About Glass

The Roman historian Pliny attributes the accidental invention of glass to Phoenician sailors cooking on a beach near Belus, Asia Minor when they set their cooking utensils on blocks of soda, carried as cargo. The fire heated the sand and the soda in turn converted into molten glass. This 5.000 B.C. historical anecdote describes the components for making glass: silica, soda ash and heat.